Tag Archives: pride symbols

Where did this “gray-asexual flag” come from?

Let me walk you through this series of events: I visited Rowan’s and Queenie’s blog and saw these two posts within a short timeframe of each other, so I thought, oh, looks like Redbeard’s been making graphics, I wonder what else he’s uploaded lately. Turns out: animated flags. Flags which I mostly recognized, except for… one, labeled as a “gray-asexual flag.”

What?

For your convenience, I’ll skip over the “I thought gray-aces already had a flag” reaction and jump straight to these other parts:

Continue reading


Ace of Labryses

Update: the sequel.

An ace of labryses playing card, followed by card suit symbols including a labrys, followed by text that says 'Aces can be lesbian. Lesbians can be ace.'

Note: the font I’m using for these is Card Characters from Harold’s Fonts, which is a free download, so feel free to use that to make your own playing card-themed stuff.


Labrys / Spade graphic

Labrys Spade aces can be lesbian. lesbians can be ace

Continuing adventures in trying to make graphics: made this the other night, born of 1) conversation with Rowan about lesbian blogs, and 2) wondering if young people remember that there’s more than one way to symbolize an orientation than with horizontally striped flags…


Update: They’ve found me out

Well, sort of.

Today I wore a shirt that has the image of an ace of spades printed on it, and since I’m with family for Christmas, several of my relatives ended up calling me an “ace”, unknowing of how true it was and leaving me grinning like the cat that ate the canary.

Then, while we were all at the table for dinner, my aunt asked me what the significance of it was.  It seems like kind of a weird question — it’s just a t-shirt, you know?  But for me, it’s not “just” a t-shirt.  If I’d have been of a mind to, that’s when I could have declared, “I’M NOT STRAIGHT,” but I didn’t.  That’s not something I want to make into a group conversation, especially when there’s not much I can do to manage their reactions.  I was a little scared, to be honest.  So I sort of weaseled my way out of answering (in my family, sometimes all you have to do is take long enough to respond and someone will end up talking over you anyway) and was left wondering if I should have done anything differently.  Mostly, it just makes me wish I were already out to someone besides my mom, or that there were some way to make my orientation known without actually having to face the daunting prospect of The Big Conversation.


Wearing Your Orientation on Your Sleeve

Today I wore the shirt I bought from One Percent World‘s redbubble account — the “Kinsey X” shirt, in purple — and I’d worn it a few times before, so it didn’t occur to me that this was the first time that some of my family members had seen it. Continue reading


Why I Wear an Ace Ring

I saw someone complaining about aces rings the other day.  The more things change, the more they stay the same.  “Really?” I thought.  “This is what they’re complaining about now?”

a black ringFrom what I can tell, some ostensibly-allosexual person walked into the tag to announce that they can’t take ace rings seriously, speaking under the assumption that aces wear ace rings to “show off” our orientation, to which they also added that wearing orientation symbols at pride events is okay but “to do it everyday is stupid, why does it have to be such a thing”, as if the choice to wear ace rings is a big, obtrusive annoyance that undercuts our credibility somehow.

Aces.  Y’know.  So in your face about their sexuality.  Continue reading