to be frank

If you’re ideologically opposed to and disturbed by Christian rhetoric about God having chosen a “future husband” for every little girl, but you’re also into those “soulmate aus” in which people have a predestined soulmate whose name appears on their arm or whatever, then what’s the point?

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7 responses to “to be frank

  • SpaceAce

    “if you’re the type of person who thinks magic isn’t real, but still enjoys the Harry Potter books, then what’s the point?”

    • Coyote

      Do you need me to explain this to you?

      • SpaceAce

        Do I? Pretty sure there’s a difference between imagining a scenario in a fictional universe and something that happens irl.

        Like yeah the idea that there MUST be a chosen/predestined person for everyone is redic and kind of scary when people force it. Not everyone wants a romantic/sexual/platonic/whatever partner obvs.

        I ask, how does musing how a FICTIONAL universe ( one where there are predestined relationships) might work and be different from our REAL universe mean that someone is not /really/ opposed to someone having a chosen future partner.

        “If you’re the type who does not believe magic is a thing, and think people who try to practice magic irl are ridiculous and wrong, yet you enjoy Harry Potter books, then what’s the point?”

        • Coyote

          “Pretty sure there’s a difference between imagining a scenario in a fictional universe and something that happens irl.”

          Yes.

          “Like yeah the idea that there MUST be a chosen/predestined person for everyone is redic and kind of scary when people force it.”

          Yes.

          “I ask, how does musing how a FICTIONAL universe ( one where there are predestined relationships) might work”

          Alright, we’ll go into this.

          1) I don’t know if you’ve ever seen the kind of posts I’m talking about, but they’re usually written with overtones of giddy romanticization; not simply “what if?” but “wouldn’t it be cool if?” The scenario is presented as desirable. In these contexts, I’ve never seen people give disgusted/horrified replies at the thought.

          2) They don’t actually muse how such a universe “might work” beyond the initial premise. In such a universe, do people know they have a soulmate beforehand? Presumably, yes? And it’s not seen as a wrongful thing for them to be taught of this?

          If so, then that would transform the “God’s future husband for you” issue from a “that’s a damaging thing to lead a child to believe” issue to a more matter of “that would be okay, except for the fact that it happens to be false.”

          I had always understood the objections to be more of the former than the latter. Romanticizing soulmates undermines such an objection’s logic.

          Does that make sense?

  • epochryphal

    Mm like the entire point of the Timer movie was how fucked the world gets bc of that idea and how it can go horribly wrong. They’re mostly fun to subvert, that’s the whole point imo. (poly, qp, disability stuff if it’s “first words they say to you” or whatever)

  • Calum P Cameron

    The one obvious point would be that the latter can serve as a pretty nice satire or deconstruction of the former.

    In cases where they’re playing it straight, though… ya got me, I got nuthin’.

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