AA: Some History, Porn, and Religion Questions

I just found your blog.

Until just a few moments ago I’d never heard of Asexuality as a recognized form of sexuality. I’d only seen it described as a kind of clinical dysfunction.

I’m always glad to learn when people are empowered to see themselves as just existing differently and not trying to force themselves into roles to “fit in”.

I am a sex & love addict in recovery and I have a million questions, as my experience is the complete opposite of what I’ve just been reading.

How long has Asexuality been recognized this way?

If Asexuals aren’t sexually attracted to anyone, do they bother watch porn for release?

Is there a form of spirituality practiced more often by Asexuals or to they find comfort in any faith?

That’s just a few immediate (obviously ignorant and I’m sorry) thoughts that came up.

Thank you for opening my eyes.

And thank you for reading.  I’ll try to address these in the order they’re listed.

First off, that depends on how you define “recognized.”  The possibility of asexuality was first “officially” acknowledged as part of the Kinsey scale in 1948.  There’s been various other models and research since then, but as you mentioned, asexuality and sex-aversion are still pathologized among many psychiatrists today, even though the latest DSM has made tepid attempts to discourage that.  Online ace communities began forming around the late nineties with such groups as Haven For the Human Amoeba, and AVEN (the most well-known today) was technically founded in 2001.  You can check out this timeline or this thread for more details.

As with anything, there are some asexual people who watch porn and some who don’t.  It’s a fairly commonly-asked question.  It’s a bit unnerving to me that the answer usually stops there, though, without any acknowledgement of the… myriad issues with the porn industry.

As far as I know, asexual people don’t differ greatly from the general population in terms of religion, although there might be a higher rate of atheists and agnostics in the online community.  You can view the 2014 community census to see the full breakdown.

Feel free to comment on this post or send me another message if you have more questions.

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